It’s a bit quiet.

Discuss anything here.. except tractors and steam engines..
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Grunt
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Grunt » Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:34 am

It’ll be the middle of summer over there so not the time to be ill at all. I’ll tell you my hernia story when I get a bit of time, it might bring a smile to your face!

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Moose
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Moose » Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:15 pm

Sorry to hear that you are laid up. It should not interfere with your ability to sample seasonal beverages though! :wink1:
1950 Tea 2080, 1951 Tea 2085
:snowman: :wink1:

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Hiawatha
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Hiawatha » Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:29 pm

Thanks for the commiserations chaps :smile:

It really is a nasty business , nothing to be taken lightly at all . I do believe I know when it happened as well , some years ago just after buying the TED .
The first wheel came off without trouble , the second almost flattened me , unbeknown to me it was water ballasted and it took a huge effort to stop it from landing right on top of me . Still I suppose it's better to have occurred that way than in some mundane chore like picking up a bag of spuds in a supermarket or lifting the dog into the back of the Landrover .
I wait with bated breath for your story Grunt , it's been a while since I had a laugh . I'm sure you are the only person I know that's strong enough and has long enough arms to crank start a TEF :smile: Whatever it was that strained you must have been a serious lump .

On the subject of ' Devil's Winnets ' , I must admit to liking them , it really does depend on the way they are cooked . Steamed or boiled ones are only good for Goose food or for throwing at nasty neighbours . I like them roasted , when the ends are lightly pared to allow the leaves to open slightly and admit the meat juices they really are delicious .
-------- 1952 TED, 1957 FE35 Grey and Gold Deluxe

Chgperformance
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Chgperformance » Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:49 am

I’m here, well somewhere!

Finally the new pistons have arrived for my 80mm. I can now finish the bargain rebuild and see how well it works........... or doesn’t :crylaughing:

I shall go for a drive on my TED soon to keep her moving. I need to spread some manure over the veg patch and plough it in for spring.

stiv
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by stiv » Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:39 pm

Hiawatha wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:29 pm
I suppose it's better to have occurred that way than in some mundane chore
My hernia story will never find a place in the 'The Legends of Hernia' (now available for xmas delivery in all online book shops, probably...), and is, to make you feel even better, Hiawatha, miles below 'crushed by a tractor wheel' on 'The All Time List of Hernias' (more of an academic tome, that one...).

I had this cough, you see. Not just a little cough, you understand, but a real cough, a coughers cough, one for the collection, a cough of bronchial proportions, and I was against the clock to finish building a wooden chicken shed before the young birds arrived (that's my day job. I've got 240 organic layers).

I guess that the effort of hammering, sawing and heaving panels became too much for my poor, tortured stomach muscles (imagine more of a Party Seven here than a six pack), already much weakened by the effort of coughing. The next coughing fit was of a force far greater than had passed before. It was the 'Perfect Storm' of a cough. Unable to draw breath through the spasm of coughing, I sank to my knees, thinking that maybe the end had come. I was to die by auto-bronchial suffocation. But the gods weren't ready for me yet, they were just testing me, and it was at the end of this, near death, experience that I realised that something had popped out. The hernia was born.

Well, I may have bigged it up a little there, but basically I coughed. The worst part for me were the metal staples they had used to close the wound. What the hell happened to silken thread?

(I normally tell people it happened when I lifted a car to save a child who had been trapped during an earthquake, but we're all freinds here...)

And I've got bronchitis at the moment, but just a little one, a 'bronchitini' (mmm! sounds as though that would go nicely with a simple tomato sauce...).

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Hiawatha
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Hiawatha » Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:21 am

stiv wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:39 pm
My hernia story will never find a place in the 'The Legends of Hernia'


The motion picture released soon featuring ' Stiv ' as Mr Numnuts , sorry ,should that be Tumnus ? :lol:
Bits of me certainly looked as if they had been cursed by the White Witch :shock:
So embarrassing I think I might return back through the wardrobe .
Is Narnia somewhere near Yorkshire ?
I know hobbits come from those regions .
-------- 1952 TED, 1957 FE35 Grey and Gold Deluxe

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Grunt
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Grunt » Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:40 am

And I've got bronchitis at the moment
Or Brownchitus as my GrandMother used to call it, I always thought it was bowel related. She used to take Halibut Orange tablets to keep it at bay.

My first hernia about 20 years ago was got through lifting ridiculously heavy lumps of steel instead of using a hoist, just to save time in a job that I didn’t get paid enough. Any how it was eventually operated on in the pioneering days in our area of key hole surgery. They made three small incisions in my stomach, one to blow gas into the stomach to expand everything to give them a bit of space, one for the implements and the third for a camera. The site of the hernia operation wasn’t any problem at all, it was the area behind the hole that they put the camera through that was painful, I’m sure they shoved an old box brownie in there.

Because I was amongst the first to have it done by key hole surgery I was a bit of a novelty and had to go back to the hospital a few times for them to have a general prod and poke at their handiwork. The last time I went the waiting time was ridiculous and a nurse kept writing a new extended time on a notice board, and all this time I was getting myself in a right palaver knowing that I had to drop my pants in front of a doctor and let him inspect my general todger area. The best part of three hours went by and I was getting more and more het up before I eventually got led in to see the Doctor and his sidekick and all I wanted to do was get it over and done with.

The doc ask me how I was doing and if there were any problems. I answered no, and because I was so stressed I immediately dropped my trousers and pants, he was sat down with his head at my approximate bollock height, and I was stood a little in his personal space. He looked somewhat bemused his sidekick was positively smirking, doc said everything looked ok and there was no need for him to see me again. Realising I’d been a little previous in the dropping my pants bit, he probably didn’t want to prod and poke let alone have a look, and I was standing uncomfortably close to him, I took a step back while turning around to pull my pants back up. It was then that I realised that three more nurses had come into the room and one of them had brought the next patient in. I probably have the record for the amount of people with a bemused look on their face while I’ve got my willy out.

12 years later I managed to give myself a second hernia on the other side to the first one, this time it was through lifting the back axles and transmission case on the Fergie. Any how by then they were dab hands at the operation and everything went smoothly, except for the fact that the bloke doing the operation was the sidekick from the exposing myself debacle. I did wonder if he remembered me if he did he was to professional to mention it.

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Fergymal
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Fergymal » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:25 am

Trying to work my way around this new web site. Had a problem finding post I had not read. Hit the Post a Reply button on this subject and it took awhile to get to a screen were I could type a response.
Mal
1948 TEA 20 showpony
1955 TEA 20 for tractor treks
1956 TEC 20 showpony
1954 TED 20 farm tractor
1955 TEF 20 to be restored
1957 FE35 Diesel under restoration for show

stiv
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by stiv » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:58 am

I remember being given Haliborange tablets when I was a lad.
Grunt wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:40 am
had to go back to the hospital a few times for them to have a general prod and poke
Are you sure they weren't just looking for their 'lost' camera?

Two very manly hernias, Grunt. Well done! They put you right up the list!

Hiawatha wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 12:21 am
as Mr Numnuts , sorry ,should that be Tumnus ?
Not sure about Numnuts, what with it being Christmas 'n all. I'll settle for Tumnus, as it gives me more leeway to stuff my tum!

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Hiawatha
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Re: It’s a bit quiet.

Post by Hiawatha » Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:47 pm

Mr Tumnus Stiv , he sort of looks a bit Galic as well :smile1:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Tumnus
Grunt wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:40 am
I was standing uncomfortably close to him, I took a step back while turning
Blimey Grunt ,thinking about the possible outcomes of this were enough to make me pop a stitch or two , especially at Christmas time , Turkey Slapping comes to mind :shock:
No such luxuries as Keyholes for me , in fact the incision is so large that you could probably adjust a TEA's valves through it quite comfortably , I'm sure an 85mm piston complete with rings would pass through with room to spare . Too much scaring and odd bits of metal in there for such ' Modern ' innovations .
Is it really necessary to blow gas into a Yorkshireman's abdomen ? Especially if he's been eating ' Devils Winnets ' . :lol1:
-------- 1952 TED, 1957 FE35 Grey and Gold Deluxe

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