Discovery 300tdi clutch

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stiv
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Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by stiv » Wed Oct 30, 2019 8:24 am

I've been 'nursing' a slipping clutch for several months now, but it's getting quite bad and really needs changing.I want to have a go at doing it myself, as it doesn't sound too difficult, as jobs go, but I worry that I might be a little under-equipped (tools and experience!).

After a little searching I'm not too sure how best to start, as some say to take the engine out, others to drop the gearbox/transfer box...

I should be most grateful for your thoughts, tips, advice, techniques, etc...

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Grunt
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by Grunt » Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:06 pm

Ive only got experience of my 90, and having done it both ways found it easier to remove the gearbox if I was doing it by myself, though you do need to make a lifting rig that fits inside the cab. Which will probably be even more difficult on a Disco. If you've got someone to help waggle, heave and shove I reckon taking the engine out may be easier. With the turbo diesel engine only special tool needed is a clutch alignment tool.

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Grunt
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by Grunt » Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:00 pm

Which will probably be even more difficult on a Disco
Or even impossible, you can take the floor out on a 90.

C@sp@r
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by C@sp@r » Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:54 pm

Handling a gearbox under the car could be a quite awkward, heavy, task. If you have a lift and transmission stand, possibly preferred option. Can you reach all the bolts from below? Do you know what the manual says?
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stiv
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by stiv » Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:42 pm

Thank you for your replies.

I do have the Haynes manual , which suggests taking the engine out as the easiest option, if no other work is forseen on the transfer/gearbox, but you do need some kind of overhead hoist, and likely, as you suggest Grunt, an assistant, otherwise dropping the box seems to be more popular, but once again some way of supporting the weight and possibly an assistant...

Access is possible from the inside by removing the centre console, gear levers and associated gubbins. A suggestion is to use heavy duty trestles each side, with a solid bar passed through the windows and a block and tackle to support the gearbox. It should then be possible to slide it back enough to gain access to the clutch (it says here...).

I don't have a transmission stand, C@sp@r, and apparently the bolts on the top of the housing are very difficult to get at, but it may still be my best option, as removing the engine sounds more complicated with my limited equipment... And I'm likely, of course, to find other problems while I'm down there...

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White Wolf
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by White Wolf » Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm

I have removed the gearbox from my Disco 2 several times, my previous Discovery and my Classic Range Rover. I have always done the removal from under the car however my father claims it is easier to remove the engine to do the clutch than work underneath.
If you remove the transfer case and gearbox together you will need some kind of transmission stand. If you separate the transfer case from the gearbox and remove them one at a time they are more manageable. I have removed the transfer case by hand and bench pressed it back in, this is made easier if you remove the top/rear cover on the transfer case and remove the input gear. I have removed the gearbox balanced on a trolley jack. The best solution so far was purchasing a small hydraulic table/trolley on caster wheels (off eBay) that supports about 300kg. I intended to make a plate to bolt to the angled cover of the transfer case and bolted to the table top but an assortment of blocks of wood to match the shape of the transfer case and the Lamd Rover bottle jack under the gear box to adjust angles ended up doing the trick.
If you separate the transfer case from gearbox be careful not to damage the input seal in the transfer case on re assembly. I made three guide studs from six inch bolts with the heads removed and rounded, threaded into the gearbox. This is to line up the transfer case and slide it into position without sliding the transfer input seal on the gearbox output spline.
The top bell housing bolts can be hard to reach. Working from above, depending on how tight they are you may be able to undo them with a good ring spanner. The great thing with the RRC is the bonnet opens right up to the windscreen, with a Disco removing the bonnet can make access easier. On my previous Disco one top bolt was so tight I rounded the bolt head with a double hex ring spanner, then after hammering a single hex socket on with an extension back to the hand brake drum I completely rounded the head off. So with the gearbox mounts removed I dropped the gearbox and right down I removed the bolt head with a diegrinder holding it with one arm on either side of the gearbox and no way of seeing what mess I was making.
1950 TEA, 1962 MF35 petrol

stiv
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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by stiv » Fri Dec 06, 2019 7:08 pm

A timely post, White Wolf. I've just made a start. Thanks for your input.

Finally, I pushed my luck too far. I needed to do one more feed run, 120km round trip, to give me a clear 4 week window to get the job done at my own, often slow, pace. Well, of course, I broke down. It was running well, and I was being very gentle with acceleration, but 20km from home and with 350kg of feed sacks in the back (I wasn't daft enough to hitch up the trailer as well...) the clutch gave up totally (with the associated 'burning' smell that stays in your nostrils for several days) and quite suddenly. No choice, I called the local garage and they came to get me with their lorry within 30 minutes. I know the owner quite well and he gave me a good price (seeing as how the nearest Land Rover dealer had quoted me 2500 euros to do the clutch, I'm still well in pocket doing it myself), but it would have been better to get back 'in one piece'.

For various reasons I've decided to do it at my place. I don't have a suitable shed or barn and so I'm doing it in the garden in front of the house. Not ideal by any means as it's open to the elements, but flat and stable. I've used some large OSB boards for the trolley jack, with offcuts under the axle stands, and tarpaulin and cardboard for lying on. I'm expecting a few logistical problems but I'll sort those as they come, I suppose. (Like how can you jack it up to put it on axle stands when the place to put the axle stands is the same as for the jack?!?!?).

I found a good post on the lr4x4.com website. It seems to be a method I can follow, with a few differences to allow for my not ideal working conditions.

https://forums.lr4x4.com/topic/6719-dis ... ch-change/

I dithered over whether to separate the transfer box, but decided not to in the end. So far, I've dismantled the centre console, with all its bits and bobs, raised the RH side (passenger side for me with LH drive) and put it on axle stands, taken of both propshafts, disconnected the exhaust at the centre bracket, and pushed it to the side, disconnected the clutch slave, jacked up the gearbox and removed the mounts (that was fun, as the trolley jack wouldn't lift it high enough to get the RH mount off. I ended up using a bottle jack under the head of the trolley jack to get the necessary 2cm extra, then removed the bottle jack) and then lowered the gearbox to rest on the cross member.

Lot's of faffing with socket heads that were too short because of long threads and other access problems for spanners due to bits of brackets etc. (and I haven't even started on the gearbox bolts yet...), but, all in all, reasonable progress.
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
I made three guide studs from six inch bolts with the heads removed and rounded
This is a good idea, and I'll use a similar technique, with long, threaded bar to keep the gearbox lined up with the engine.
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
The top bell housing bolts can be hard to reach
I haven't even seen them yet!
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
Working from above, depending on how tight they are you may be able to undo them with a good ring spanner
Do you mean from the engine compartment?

I hope I don't have the same problem with stuck bolts, as blind diegrinding sounds like a job for an expert! :P

Showers are forecast for the weekend, sadly, but I'll plod on...

Thanks again.

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Re: Discovery 300tdi clutch

Post by White Wolf » Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:03 am

stiv wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 7:08 pm
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
I made three guide studs from six inch bolts with the heads removed and rounded
This is a good idea, and I'll use a similar technique, with long, threaded bar to keep the gearbox lined up with the engine.

The only problem with threaded bar is that it may bite into alloy bell housing rather than slide.
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
The top bell housing bolts can be hard to reach
I haven't even seen them yet!
White Wolf wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:22 pm
Working from above, depending on how tight they are you may be able to undo them with a good ring spanner
Do you mean from the engine compartment?

Yes, the only way you can reach them. On the TD5's there is a thin plate between the engine and bell housing, it has one small bolt on the Left side, ease to miss.

I hope I don't have the same problem with stuck bolts, as blind diegrinding sounds like a job for an expert! :P
Just shut your eyes and hope for the best :o


For various reasons I've decided to do it at my place. I don't have a suitable shed or barn and so I'm doing it in the garden in front of the house. Not ideal by any means as it's open to the elements, but flat and stable. I've used some large OSB boards for the trolley jack, with offcuts under the axle stands, and tarpaulin and cardboard for lying on. I'm expecting a few logistical problems but I'll sort those as they come, I suppose. (Like how can you jack it up to put it on axle stands when the place to put the axle stands is the same as for the jack?!?!?).

We've all been there!
774952_201522586653219_1671532280_o.jpg
774952_201522586653219_1671532280_o.jpg (124.99 KiB) Viewed 38 times
I also found that my trolley jack was a bit short so I turned a block of wood to fit the jack and gear box.
1950 TEA, 1962 MF35 petrol

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